Scottish Rite Temple 1931

Scottish Rite Temple 1931

The Scottish Rite of Freemasons began construction of the temple building on Charles Street in 1930, and the building was opened in 1932. The building was designed by noted architect (and Scottish Rite Mason) Clyde N. Friz and renowned architect John Russell Pope. Friz’s other works in Baltimore include Enoch Pratt Free Library and Standard Oil Building. A nationally renowned architect, Pope designed the Jefferson Memorial, National Archives, National Gallery of Art, and the Masonic Temple of the Scottish Rite in Washington, as well as the Baltimore Museum of Art in Baltimore.

The Scottish Rite Temple is both Italian Renaissance and Beaux Arts Classical in style, with a columned portico based on the Pantheon in Rome. Eight 34-foot columns with Corinthian capitals provide the entrance facing Charles Street, and the entry consists of two massive bronze doors.

The building was added to Baltimore’s list of historic landmarks in 2009 with the support of Baltimore Heritage and any future plans for the buildings must meet strong preservation guidelines.

This historic building in Baltimore was in dire need of tuckpointing and stone patching services when Ev-Air-Tight was asked to investigate and evaluate the situation. We were referred to this project by a member of the Scottish Rite for whom we have worked on buildings under his control.  The project required a complete scaffolding of the entire exterior of the building.  All mortar joints were tuckpointed and patched as needed. All stone was cleaned and restored to its historical splendor.

When your project calls for critical attention to detail, strict guidelines, and expert care, count on Ev-Air-Tight, Shoemaker.